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Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of Soil erosion and its on-farm productivity consequences found in the catalog.

Soil erosion and its on-farm productivity consequences

Pierre R. Crosson

Soil erosion and its on-farm productivity consequences

what do we know?

by Pierre R. Crosson

  • 299 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Resources for the Future in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil erosion,
  • Soil productivity,
  • Agricultural productivity,
  • Crops and soils -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 15-18)

    StatementPierre Crosson.
    SeriesDiscussion paper -- 95-29., Discussion paper (Resources for the Future) -- 95-29.
    ContributionsResources for the Future.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. ;
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17739687M
    OCLC/WorldCa33383202

      This book presents the dynamic and cumulative effects of soil erosion on on-farm economy and its off-site effects on inland wetland services. To quantify and value these damages two procedures rely on a limited data set are developed, one of which to estimate the shadow price of soil erosion by using survey data and RUSLE : Jorge de Prada, Farhed Shah, Boris Bravo-Ureta. Soil erosion, use of chemical pesticides and herbicides, unsustainable agricultural practices, excessive farming, water pollution and land pollution are some of the aspects upsetting the natural functions of the soil. This is where soil conservation comes in. Soil conservation is the practice of protecting the soil against erosion or deterioration.

    The first estimates of soil erosion costs were made by Bennett () in the United States. He expressed concern about the consequences of soil erosion in the US and used information on soil erosion costs to alert farmers, society and the government for the need and importance of adopting conservation practices. At the root of the problem was that there was no clear-cut proof that soil erosion led to reduced productivity. For one thing, even though ridges and knobs had lost much of their topsoil by early 20th century, overall, the loess was plentiful and deep, built up by thousands of years of southwest prevailing winds depositing the rich glacial silt.

    The book is an outcome of a symposium on the impacts of soil erosion on crop productivity. The aims were to begin to define: newline˜ (1) The physical extent of the problem whereby soil erosion is decreasing crop productivity on agricultural lands of the USA; newline˜ (2) Philosophical, socioeconomic, and institutional causes of excessive or accelerated erosion in .   Soil erosion is a global issue because of its severe adverse economic and environmental impacts. Economic impacts on productivity may be due to direct effects on crops/plants on-site and off-site, and environmental consequences are primarily off-site due either to pollution of natural waters or adverse effects on air quality due to dust and emissions .


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Soil erosion and its on-farm productivity consequences by Pierre R. Crosson Download PDF EPUB FB2

ON-FARM AND OFF-FARM CONSEQUENCES OF SOIL EROSION 65 cause of soil productivity losses. The most serious impacts occur when erosion reduces the depth of already shallow topsoils underlain by inhospitable clay subsoils or other material unfavorable to plant growth, or reduces shallow soils underlain by bedrock.

Silvia Stanchi The book deals with several aspects of soil erosion, focusing on its connection with the agricultural world. Chapters’ topics are various, ranging from irrigation practices to soil nutrient, land use changes or tillage by: 9.

EROSION - ITS EFFECT ON SOIL PROPERTIES, PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFIT ISSUED: REVISED: L. Murdock and W.W. Frye Department of Agronomy Almost all people recognize that erosion is harmful, but few realize how harmful. Certainly, there are costs to society for clean-up and repair from soil and its constituents polluting the water and air.

Soil erosion is a major environmental issue because it can lead to water pollution. But did you know that soil erosion also can seriously impair crop productivity.

Most agriculture activities, especially on sloping landscapes, increase the potential for soil erosion. When soil erosion is severe, soil erodes faster than it can be renewed. For most areas of Iowa, the loss of 1 inch. Abstract. Soil erosion and the effects of soil erosion on crop productivity have become emotional issues and have attracted the attention of agriculturists, environmentalists, and the public in general.

In spite of heavy investments in research and development, the global rates of accelerated erosion are now presumbly higher than ever by: Soil erosion is the biggest threat to soil fertility and productivity, as it removes organic matter and important nutrients and prevents vegetation growth, which negatively affects overall.

Soil erosion is a gradual process that occurs when the impact of water or wind detaches and removes soil particles, causing the soil to deteriorate. Soil deterioration and low water quality due to erosion and surface runoff have become severe problems worldwide.

The problem may become so severe that the land can no longer be cultivated and must be abandoned. P. Crosson, Soil Erosion and Its On-farm Productivity Consequences: What Do We Know. (Resources for the Future, Washington, DC, ). The consequences of soil erosion are primarily centered on reduced agricultural productivity as well as soil quality.

Water ways may also be blocked, and it may affect water quality. This means most of the environmental problems the world face today arises from soil erosion. The effects of soil erosion include. Effects of Soil Erosion. The major effects of soil erosion include: Loss of Arable Land.

Soil erosion removes the top fertile layer of the soil. This layer is rich in the essential nutrients required by the plants and the soil. The degraded soil does not support crop production and leads to low crop productivity.

Clogging of Waterways. The agricultural plants that often replace the trees cannot hold onto the soil and many of these plants, such as coffee, cotton, palm oil, soybean and wheat, can actually worsen soil erosion.

And as land loses its fertile soil, agricultural producers move on, clear more forest and continue the cycle of soil loss. Excessive (or accelerated) erosion causes both "on-site" and "off-site" problems. On-site impacts include decreases in agricultural productivity and (on natural landscapes) ecological collapse, both because of loss of the nutrient-rich upper soil layers.

In some cases, the eventual end result is desertification. Soil erosion reduces cropland productivity and contributes to the pollution of adjacent watercourses, wetlands and lakes. Soil erosion can be a slow process that continues relatively unnoticed or can occur at an alarming rate, causing serious loss of topsoil.

soil erosion, deforestation and rural livelihoods in thecentral rift valley area of ethiopia: a case study in the denku micro-watershed oromia region. After this, known facts about the cost of erosion are schematized; on the one hand, the immediate on-site effects of erosion and runoff on production, nutrient losses and the long-term productivity of degraded soil at the plot level; on the other hand, the off-site problems and damage caused by runoff when it swells peak floods, reactivates.

On-site effects of erosion #1 Impaired soil productivity. Agricultural land is among the most affected lands by erosion worldwide. For example, most cultivated lands in Iowa lose to erosion two to five tons of topsoil per acre per year [10].

The loss of topsoil is what decreases the productivity of soils and negatively affects our capability to. Bullock, in Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment, Soil Erosion. Soil erosion is the movement and transport of soil by various agents, particularly water, wind, and mass movement; hence climate is a key factor.

It has been recognized as a major problem since the s and, although there has been some 70 years of research into the causes and processes, it is still.

2 Soil Erosion Soil productivity factors that are usually diminished by soil erosion include direct loss of soil fertility, loss of soil organic matter, deterioration of soil structure, and decreased water-supplying capacity (capacity to provide water to growing plants).

The primary seat of fertility of many soils is the topsoil. Read this article to learn about Soil Fertility – Its Meaning, Causes and Maintenance. Soil fertility may be defined as the ability of soil to provide all essential plant nutrients in available forms and in a suitable balance whereas soil productivity is the resultant of several factors such as soil fertility, good soil management practices availability of water supply and suitable climate.

Effect of the annual crop type on soil losses by erosion. Average rainfall of 1 mm and a slope between and percent 89 Effect of the type of perennial crop or vegetation on erosion losses of soil.

Weighted averages for three soil types in. Soil erosion is the major cause of soil degradation. In the soil erosion, uppermost fertile layer of soil which contains essential nutrients is lost. Thus soil becomes deficient in essential minerals and this results in productivity loss.

Deforestation or destruction of forests accompanied by reduced frequency of rainfall leads to soil erosion.Soil is not immune to erosion, and like rocks along a coastline, soil can erode due to the effects of forces, such as water, wind and farming practices.

In this lesson, we will learn about soil.The soil erosion risk has increased by % of the total area, and decreased by %, showing that the overall soil erosion situation is worsening in the study area.